Trust for America's Health Initiatives

Health Disparities

Health Disparities

Every American should have the opportunity to be as healthy as he or she can be. But now, health varies dramatically from state to state and community to community. Access to good medical care is obviously one important factor that impacts how healthy a person is, but a number of other factors play a role in health beyond medical care. In fact, many researchers have found that where you live, your income level, socio-economic group, and behavior often impact your health more than either genetics or access to medical care.

Health disparities are a significant threat to our nation's health. Low-income and minority communities systematically have less access to health care, higher exposure to health threats, and worse health outcomes.

TFAH addresses health disparities and factors that are beyond individual control, often called "social determinants," as a central part of our work. TFAH advocates for strategies to improve the health of all Americans, regardless of race, ethnicity, income or where they live.

Policy and Advocacy

For TFAH position statements and letters, congressional hearings, briefings and testimony, and additional policy and advocacy materials, click here.


Press Releases

September 12, 2016
Trust for America’s Health Conducts Social Media Awareness Campaign in Support of Emergency Funding for Zika Prevention and Response

January 19, 2016
Trust for America’s Health Statement on Bipartisan Senate Agriculture Committee Compromise on Child Nutrition Reauthorization

January 15, 2016
TFAH Applauds the Obama Administration for Showing Strong Support for Increased Collaboration between the Health and Education Sectors

December 17, 2015
Report Finds Major Gaps in Country’s Ability to Prevent and Control Infectious Disease Outbreaks 28 States and Washington, D.C. Reach Half or Fewer of Key Indicators

November 19, 2015
Nearly Half of States Score 5 or Lower out of 10 on Substance Misuse Prevention Report Card Youth Drug Overdose Death Rates more than Doubled in 35 States in Just Over a Decade

More press releases


Resources

Selected items from TFAH's Resource Library:

A virtual guide of the symptoms of Hepatitis C and how it affects the body Hepatitis C is a viral disease that primarily causes inflammation of the liver, but the effects can be felt throughout the body. Hepatitis C is caused by a virus that is passed through contact with the blood of an infected person. The infection leads to inflammation of the liver.

Addiction Center: Health Effects of Youth Substance Abuse Addiction Center was founded by recovering addicts and health professionals to provide the most up-to-date information on various addictions and reviews of top treatment centers across the country.

Addressing the Social Determinants of Health Inequities Among Gay Men & Men Who Have Sex With Men With support from the M·A·C AIDS Fund, TFAH undertook a literature review and convened a one-day consultation to consider strategies to mitigate the social determinants of health inequities among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM).† Invited participants included research scientists, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)‡ health service providers, public policy advocates, and federal officials.*

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation The Kaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation, focusing on the major health care issues facing the U.S. Their three major focus points are policy analysis and research, acting as a clearinghouse for public health and policy information, and developing and running large-scale public health information campaigns in the United States and around the world.

HIV Prevention for Gay Men & Men Who Have Sex with Men: Development of a Comprehensive Policy Agenda The President released the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (National Strategy) in July 2010 with an aim to reduce new HIV infections, increase access to care for people living with HIV and to reduce HIV-related health disparities in the United States. Although the National Strategy identified several priority populations, the document specifically cited CDC surveillance data that reported that gay and bisexual men are the only population in the U.S. where new cases of HIV are rising. In response, amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research and the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), supported by funding from the M∙A∙C AIDS FUND, convened a meeting of experts on October 26, 2010, to: • Develop a comprehensive public policy agenda to more effectively prevent HIV transmission among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). • Engage HIV/AIDS and gay health advocates to re-think and improve current methods of prevention. • Provide guidance to decision-makers on how to formulate the most effective HIV prevention strategy.

More resources